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Women In Focus exhibit

June 2nd, 2022

Women In Focus exhibit

I am honored to have a couple of my infrared photos in this exhibit. Women In Focus at Webster library in Webster Groves, Missouri. Opening reception is Friday, June 3, 2022 from 5:30 to 7:30pm Over 50 photos from 25 women photographers.

I won a pair of socks in a photo contest.

January 16th, 2022

I won a pair of socks in a photo contest.

I am honored to win 3rd place in Terrain Magazine's photography contest. I used my infrared camera to capture this peaceful image located in Missouri. What did I win? A pair of socks and 1 year subscription to Terrain Magazine. I can always use a new pair of socks.

Art St. Louis HOPE exhibit

February 1st, 2021

Art St. Louis HOPE exhibit

During the 2020 Covid pandemic, I began exploring the wet cyanotype process. Luckily, one of my cyanotypes was included in Art. St. Louis' HOPE exhibit. This online exhibit features work from St. Louis area artists
The Virtual gallery can be found here: https://www.artstlouis.org/index.php/exhibitions/in-the-gallery/hope
• Facebook Album with all 48 works in the show: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?vanity=ArtSaintLouis&set=a.10157576909911962
• Facebook Event for the exhibit: https://www.facebook.com/events/1671869109682945/

Tips for viewing the Virtual Gallery: You can view the Virtual Gallery on your computer or tablet using any web browser. If you have difficulty seeing artworks on the desktop version of this presentation, clear out your cache and completely refresh your browser (hold down the Shift Key while you also refresh the browser page), then reload the exhibit to view. To view the Gallery on your mobile device, download the Exhibbit mobile app for free free from your App Store.

Juror, Robin Hirsch-Steinhoff's statement:

"I created “Hope” as our first virtual exhibit of 2021 as an act of pure optimism. Optimism that the world and its inhabitants would be in a better place in the new year. Yes… I realize that every new year brings us a renewed sense of hope, but as I’m sure you’ll agree—2021 is different.

As we closed out 2020, there seemed to be a resounding sense that 2021 could begin to heal humanity and the world at-large. As the new year approached, I felt a rising energy from the regional art community—artists seemed especially driven to express that surge of hope in their works, suggesting that a more positive future was well within their grasp. Or maybe I’m just projecting. But then again, when we look at art don’t we often project our own experiences into what is presented before us, interpreting that artwork through our own lenses?

For the “Hope” exhibit, we asked regional artists to submit artworks that consider, interpret or depict the idea of hope and how it applies to the events of 2020 as well as how it affects them in the new year. For jurying, 69 artists submitted 154 original artworks specifically created in 2020 or 2021 for my consideration from which I selected works by 48 artists from Missouri, Illinois and Kentucky for the show. This exhibit features 48 works in ceramics, collage, digital art, drawing, mixed media, painting, photography, printmaking, and textiles.

The artworks that I selected for the show address many responses to and interpretations and depictions of what hope means, including imagery about birth as well as rebirth—in nature, spiritualism, faith, parenthood, family. There are also works that depict a new day and images that present a clear path away from the viewer and, at least in my interpretation, toward the future. There are artworks that celebrate the family bond as well as what friendship means. And there are artworks that address the hope for concrete, lasting change. I hope that you will enjoy this exhibit and find expressions that speak strongly to you.

Thank you to everyone who submitted artwork for my consideration for this show and to the 48 artists whose works are featured here. It is my life’s work to celebrate the work of our region’s talented artists and I am honored to present these works to you in this special exhibit."

Beyond the Lens XV Framations

January 23rd, 2021

Beyond the Lens XV Framations

I am honored to win first prize in the Beyond The Lens XV photography exhibit. I submitted an infrared photo. Infrared photography captures invisible light. Any plant that contains chlorophyll turns bright white, giving the images an ethereal quality.

Beyond the Lens XV:
A Photography Exhibition

Exhibition on Display: Jan 22 - Feb 25, 2021

An exhibition of photographic works in all disciplines.

Featuring artwork by:
Erik S. Anderson Ruth Ann Bauers Jill Beyder
Marcus Burzota Michael C. Daft Darrel Eaton
Steve Femmer Marcia M. Gay Beth Goyer
Katherine Hicks Pat Jackson Debbie Kindschuh
Dianna Knobbe Jane Linders Christine Lohse
Liz McCarthy Marty McKay Marilyn O'Neill
Wanda Parsons Anthony Philip Rosa Renner
Ginger Repke Holly Ross Carolyn Schlueter
Christy Schneller Tom Strutz Tricia Wakeman
Barbara Zucker
BTL 2020

About Juried Exhibits

Jurors: Amy Wilson and Sarah Merideth founded Framations Custom Framing business in 2005 and opened their brick and mortar shop with the addition of the art gallery in 2006. Before their 14+ years of Gallery ownership, exhibit management and 40+ combined years of framing experience: Amy's background includes decades of management experience in photo labs with both film and digital media, home decor, and custom framing. Sarah's background includes a BA in art with experience in working in and critiquing multimedia work, and several years of management and framing experience.

Over the years, the owners of Framations have been asked repeatedly what a juror is looking for and more often why particular pieces were not chosen to be part of an exhibit. As part a nod to the 15th annual exhibit and also an experiment in critique and appreciation to the artists exhibiting with Framations, the owners have to decide to co-jury Beyond the Lens XV.

The owners are offering this exhibit as a critique process for artists. Each piece entered will have at least a brief comment provided from the jurors in regards to either why it was accepted, why it was declined, or some other constructive criticism intended to encourage and improve the artist’s craft. As we all know, there is a level of subjectivity in any sort of judgement, but the elements of art as well as technique. craftsmanship and presentation will be a focus.

Artist statement:

I used infrared technology to capture this serene Buddha statue located in Big Sur California. This image is perfect for your home, office, yoga studio or mediation room.

This image is one of my Feng Shui series. The presence of this image in a home or business environment creates a sense of focus. While much household ornamentation can be appreciated for its aesthetics, in feng shui the primary purpose has been to solicit good fortune for it's inhabitants. Our surroundings project onto our moods and spirits. The things we look at, even if just a glimpse, effect our subconscious. We can accomplish harmony by using art which is first of all aesthetic ,but also functional to create a sense of ease and good fortune in our everyday lives.

Sell Art Online

Wall Art

Cyanotypes featured in Ladue News Art And Soul

January 7th, 2021

Cyanotypes featured in Ladue News Art And Soul

I am very honored to be the featured artist in Ladue News Art and Soul section. They are featuring my wet cyanotype series and a little blurb about how I coped as an artist during the pandemic. I appreciate the support!

Staying busy is my go-to coping strategy and printing using the wet cyanotype method kept me distracted during this troubling pandemic. Cyanotypes, also called “sun prints” are one of the oldest photographic printing processes dating back to 1842. Sir John Herschel developed this first silver less photographic process using only two chemicals and the sun as a light source. These sun prints are decidedly low tech as the final image of a cyanotoype appears only with the aid of sunlight as a light source and water for a developer. This inexpensive, simple and permanent process was used for the blue print process for copying architectural plans, hence the name “Blueprint” as the images are a deep Prussian blue color. The very first book of printed text and photographs by Anna Atkin used the cyanotype process. My attraction to the cyanotype process is the physical involvement during the printing process allowing me to use my hand,eyes and intuition. I like the way the light, time, salts and myself slowly deposit an image on beautifully hand crafted paper.
My backyard garden represented a constant coming and going of the seasons and were a source of comfort and joy in the ever changing world. As plants popped up here and there, it was a reminder to slow down and remember that everything has its own time. I marked the passing of the seasons by printing cyanotypes directly from plants found in my suburban back yard. The varieties of leaves and weather produces variable results. These prints were made during the sultry St. Louis summer days. I tossed the spice turmeric on the prints for splash of yellow color and to mimic the flash of lightening of quick thunderstorms that so often interrupted my printing process and the fireflies that lit up the summer night skies.

Many 19th century processes, like cyanotypes, are making a comeback with fine art photographers. You can see modern versions of this antique process in many art exhibits and museums around the country. The current revival of alternative process is more than a trend and I find the hands on technique much more satisfying than simply pressing a print key on a computer.

Wet Cyanotype Process

July 9th, 2020

Wet Cyanotype Process

Cyanotypes, also called sun prints, are one of the oldest photographic printing processes dating back to 1842. Sir John Herschel developed this first silver less photographic process using only 2 chemicals and the sun as a light source. These sun prints are decidedly low tech as the final image of a cyanotype appears only with the aid of sunlight as a light source and water for a developer. This inexpensive, simple and permanent process was used for the blue print process for copying architectural plans, hence the name
“Blue print.” The very first book of printed text and photographs by Anna Atkin used the Cyanotype process.

This process involves two stock solutions that are mixed together and coated on watercolor paper. After the paper dries, plants from my garden are s placed over the paper, bubbles are smeared on top of the plants turmeric is sprinkled here and there for color. Plastic wrap is placed over the plants and paper and placed in the sun or a UV light source, anywhere from 10 to 30 minutes, depending on the day, time of year, cloud cover and density of the negative. The cyanotype print is washed in plain tap water and dried in the air. Unlike traditional prints, the texture of the watercolor paper adds interesting tonal qualities and creative dimensions to the printing process. Many 19th century processes, like Cyanotypes are making a comeback with the fine art photographers. You can see modern versions of this antique process in many art exhibits and museums around the country. This current revival of alternative processes is more than a trend. I think the attraction for these old processes is the physical involvement during the printing processes, allowing photographers to use our hands, eyes and intuition when printing. This hands on technique is much more satisfying than simply pressing a print key on a computer.

Art Prints

Ethical Society Exhibit

January 22nd, 2020

Ethical Society Exhibit

David Ottinger

In a speech from the spring of 2016, I tried to sum up the essence of what I feel every artist tries to accomplish. I stated, “Only that which redefines the definition of the word has any chance to become that which it pretends to define.”

It is certainly no simple task to change the definition of a word. However, every great artist throughout history has done just that. Jackson Pollack, Camille Pissarro and Leonardo Da Vinci changed the definition of painting. Donatello (Donato di Nicocolò di Betto Bardi) and Donald Judd and Kara Walker changed the definition of sculpture. David Octavius Hill and Edward Stieglitz and Cindy Sherman changed photography.

As a student I was enthralled with two topics, art and psychology. At times I try to bring the two together in the same conversation. Though I taught Figure Drawing, Painting and Art History for decades, I am still enchanted with the idea of bringing psychology and painting together in a way that tries to define the moment when an individual makes a decision or comes to a realization about a dilemma or idea.

It is the search for that indefinable idea that intrigues me the most and of course, is the most elusive.

Jane Linders

Jane Linders is an award winning photographer whose prints are in numerous national and international collections. Linders has exhibited her work everywhere from her home town in St. Louis to the Smithsonian Museum in Washington D.C. She is a tireless imagemaker who mines the oddities of roadside America.

After several years of traditional photography, I began to experiment with infrared photography because I enjoy the otherworldly quality of the image. My photos are not an in-your-face kind of intensity, but a gentle, matter of fact, I am here and I have always been here kind of statement, that builds the more your look at my image. Infrared photography broadened my photographic notions and expanded my creativity. I like how beautifully infrared light is reflected and absorbed by different surfaces. This non traditional photography allowed me to capture traditional subjects in a novel and interesting way. My major influence is the work of William Eggleston, who creates art from commonplace subjects and finds beauty in the banal and mundane.

Christine Ilewski

Christine Ilewski lives in Alton, IL. She received her BFA from the Univ. of WI-Eau Claire, did masters work at Lindenwood Univ. and SIUE where she completed K-12 teaching certification. She taught in the U-City school district. She has been the Visting Artist for Liquitex for 20 years, bringing a materials and methods workshop to university campuses around the midwest.

Her studio work is primarily acrylic with multiple mixed media elements. She describes her current work: “My work has always been “personal.” My work has reflected my experience as a woman, a mother, a wife, a sister, a daughter; a domestic, intimate life. Landscape has almost always been the background to my narratives, but in my most recent work it seems to have become my center…a place of reflection, a still point from which everything else revolves. These landscapes are bubbling up from a subconscious stream, a “river” of relationships. With a studio overlooking the Mississippi, the mighty river runs through all my work. “

She is also the founder/director of the nonprofit Faces Not Forgotten (www.facesnotforgotten.com) , a memorial project of portaits of young gun violence victims. Christine was awarded the 2013 Critical Mass Stimulus Grant for this project and has exhibited the project throughout St. Louis and the campuses of UMSL, Rutgers, Northeastern and Blackburn universities. BBC America did a piece on FNF in 2017.

Her studio work can be seen in the IL state Artisan shops, the Museum of Contemporary Art, New Harmony, Ariodante Gallery NOLA and many private collections. www.ilewski.com 618-806-6747

This group show will run from January 26 through March 9, with a reception on Sunday, January 26, 12:30 to 2:30.

St. Louis Public Library exhibits Invisible Light

September 4th, 2019

St. Louis Public Library exhibits Invisible Light

I guess that I am now on the library circuit in the St. Louis area. I am happy to announce that my infrared images of St. Louis and surrounding areas will be on exhibit through September 28, 2019 at the St. Louis Public Library. Big thanks to Bridget Hurd for the opportunity and the support.

"Invisible Light"
St. Louis Public Library
3309 South Grand Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63118

September 1 through September 28, 2019

Dreamscapes Bridgeton Trails Library

August 11th, 2019

Dreamscapes Bridgeton Trails Library

Exhibit my infrared landscape photography in a library? Why not? I was returning some books to the local library when I noticed an empty case in the lobby of the library, so I inquired about exhibiting. The librarian said that someone cancelled at the last minute and she offered to let me exhibit my photos. Although it isn't a prestigious gallery space, I had nothing going on, so I immediately went home and gathered some infrared landscapes suitable for the exhibit space. While I was arranging the exhibit at least 5 people wandered by and inquired about the photos and my process. The way I figure it, nobody is going to see my photos framed and sitting in a box down my basement.

I titled the exhibit "Dreamscapes"
Bridgeton Trails Library
3347 McKelvey Road
Bridgeton, MO

August 8 through August 26, 2019.

Photo Weekly magazine

January 30th, 2019

Photo Weekly magazine

I am honored to have my infrared photo of a victorian bridge located in Forest Park, St. Louis, Missouri in the "Hot Shot" piece, page 6 of the April 2019 edition of Photo Weekly magazine. They wrote a little blurb about my photo, but it is in German, so I don't know what it says. I do like seeing von Linders in print though. lol.

 

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